Home Our Blog Page January 2013

January 2013

 

Hey man is that a six or an eight?

 

 

Anyone who does not work in a County that does not have on-line records can’t fully appreciate the value in records research at your desk. Along with the metal detector and electronic distances measuring devises (I am still not sure which I would give up if required) comes on-line records research. Don’t leave out CADD; I know I would quite if I have to go back to hand lettering or dust off the Leroy Set. The ability to research and print documents onsite is truly a technological advancement that is of untold value to surveyors. My concern and the reason for this writing is the much too often problem of legibility. G. S. 47-30 Section (b) states “The recorded plat must be such that the public may obtain legible copies.” This section allows Register of Deeds to return the original plat to the person indicated on the plat as long as a legible security copy is maintained. We also have Standards of Practice for Land Surveying in North Carolina Section .1602 Subsection (f) that requires the results of a survey be reported in a clear and factual manner. During most every survey I run into a scanned document that I can’t read. The joy of seeing a note, in the description, that the survey is attached scours quickly when you discover that you can’t read a thing on it. Scanned Documents less than a year old that require a trip to the Register of Deeds to obtain a copy of the original should not have been placed online. I am fortunate to work in Counties that retain the original; I understand that some do not. I was visiting another State’s website and learned that they are in the process of requiring legibility at a scanned resolution of 200 d.p.i. I would guess that Counties use different procedures to secure scans for online documents and most probably include some type of quality checks before placing online; however, I think way too many are getting passed through. As surveyors we must produce plats that are legible, after scanning, by using proper lines weights and fonts sizes. I assure you that I will continue going to the Register of Deeds when need be and complain very little, but I know we can do better.